© LA Times, Sep. 1932, Prospector holds small gold nuggets found in the East Fork of the San Gabriel River

“There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls, doing more murder in this loathsome world, than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.”  ― William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

© John Malmin / LA Times, Jan. 1964, Irazú Volcano, Costa Rica

Cattle graze in pasture that escaped destruction from the eruption of the Irazú volcano in Costa Rica. Many other nearby fields were not so lucky. This photo was published in the Jan. 19, 1964 Los Angelest Times.

On March 19, 1963, the Costa Rican volcano Irazu began an eruption lasting into 1965. San Jose, the capital of Costa Rica, was daily covered by additional ash.

You can read the original story in Los Angeles Times, here’s a short excerpt:

For 10 months the almost 300,000 inhabitants of metropolitan San Jose have been living in the “valley of the shadow of death.”

© Steve Fontanini / LA Times, 1961, Ripped American flag
While sitting in police custody, Jesus Farias Iglesias, 28, is framed by the U.S. flag he tore off a staff, ripped and trampled as 200 schoolchildren watched in astonishment.
This photo was published on Page One of The Times and also was distributed by AP and appeared in newspapers all over the United States.
An article in the Nov. 11, 1961, Los Angeles Times reported:

A 28-year-old laborer Friday tore a large American Flag off a staff in Olvera Street, ripped and trampled it as 200 elementary school children, on a tour of the site where Los Angeles originated, looked on in shocked astonishment.
Witnesses told police Jesus Farias Iglesias, a transient, shouted in Spanish: “We’re blaspheming, having this Flag in the street!” They also quoted him as saying the United States is persecuting Mexico and its people.
The children, from the Downey and Baldwin Park school districts, and Mexican-Americans along the historical street were shocked by the incident and voiced their displeasure, said Sgt. C.E. Leonard.
An Olvera Street candy vendor, Isaias Salazar, 46, telephoned police as a leather shop employee, Raul Varela, followed Iglesias to nearby Plaza Park. Iglesias sat down on a bench there and Varela pointed him out to police when they arrived.
The desecrated Flag was hanging from a vertical pole at 14 Olvera Street. A Mexican flag hung from a staff alongside it.
Police said the suspect, a citizen of Mexico, has been living in Southern California for seven years. He was booked for disturbing the peace.

I’d really like to know the background of this story, why he was doing it. I’m living in Austria, a country with xenophobic tendencies and a bureaucratic system that can make you lose it very easily; a country with a political system that is one of the most corrupt in Europe. I can tell you: if someone waved an Austrian flag right before my nose I’d maybe react like Mr. Iglesias did.
That’s why my favourite nation still is (and always will be): imagination.

© Steve Fontanini / LA Times, 1961, Ripped American flag

While sitting in police custody, Jesus Farias Iglesias, 28, is framed by the U.S. flag he tore off a staff, ripped and trampled as 200 schoolchildren watched in astonishment.

This photo was published on Page One of The Times and also was distributed by AP and appeared in newspapers all over the United States.

An article in the Nov. 11, 1961, Los Angeles Times reported:

A 28-year-old laborer Friday tore a large American Flag off a staff in Olvera Street, ripped and trampled it as 200 elementary school children, on a tour of the site where Los Angeles originated, looked on in shocked astonishment.

Witnesses told police Jesus Farias Iglesias, a transient, shouted in Spanish: “We’re blaspheming, having this Flag in the street!” They also quoted him as saying the United States is persecuting Mexico and its people.

The children, from the Downey and Baldwin Park school districts, and Mexican-Americans along the historical street were shocked by the incident and voiced their displeasure, said Sgt. C.E. Leonard.

An Olvera Street candy vendor, Isaias Salazar, 46, telephoned police as a leather shop employee, Raul Varela, followed Iglesias to nearby Plaza Park. Iglesias sat down on a bench there and Varela pointed him out to police when they arrived.

The desecrated Flag was hanging from a vertical pole at 14 Olvera Street. A Mexican flag hung from a staff alongside it.

Police said the suspect, a citizen of Mexico, has been living in Southern California for seven years. He was booked for disturbing the peace.

I’d really like to know the background of this story, why he was doing it. I’m living in Austria, a country with xenophobic tendencies and a bureaucratic system that can make you lose it very easily; a country with a political system that is one of the most corrupt in Europe. I can tell you: if someone waved an Austrian flag right before my nose I’d maybe react like Mr. Iglesias did.

That’s why my favourite nation still is (and always will be): imagination.

THE SENSELESS/NAMELESS SET - Part 1

Inspection: Failed

This set shows 3 pictures shot at 3 different locations in Los Angeles by 3 different photographers, in different years (Ray Graham: 1951, Jack Carrick: 1956 and Larry Sharkey: 1972).

Once upon a time…

#1: The city marshal’s office began inspection of motor vehicles for defects at four locations, taking over the duties formerly handled by the California Highway Patrol. (+)

#2: Chemical engineer Edward Liston of Stanford Research Institute checks on five subjects in a smog chamber breathing reconstituted smog and noting reactions on pads. (+)

#3: Bill Ven Douris, general manager of the Scrap Disposal Co., said the firm shreds 500 cars a day for shipment. It is not only a good business, according to Ven Douris, it cleans up the landscape.

“It’s an ecology thing, more or less,” he said Tuesday in a Lynwood wrecking yard where he was forklifting about 100 old cars into a pressing machine. Only the tires are removed before the autos go in – glass, chrome, motor and all …

After pressing the cars, they are transported to San Diego, where they are fed into a shredding machine. (+)

THE END


IMAGE INFO:
#1: © Ray Graham / LA Times, 1951, Vehicle inspection
#2: © Jack Carrick / LA Times, 1956, Smog testing
#3: © Larry Sharkey / LA Times 1972, The Kar Press


» find more senseless/nameless sets here «

© Larry Sharkey / LA Times, Oct. 31, 1950, On the ropes

Bernard “Big Duke” Docusen hangs on to the ropes at end of the second round after taking several hard punches from John L. Davis. The referee halted the bout on a technical knockout immediately after third round started. (+)

The perfect picture to show how I feel right now. But not K.O. yet.

» find more photos of famous people here «

© John Malmin / LA Times, March 23, 1948, 'Artist's Dream', near Gorman

Where the snow remains white (aside from a little yellow here and there)…

© Mary Frampton, LA Times, 1963, Through the wet window

“You’ll find that life is still worthwhile, if you just smile.”Charles Chaplin

Los Angeles Times staff photographer Mary Frampton took this 1963 photo of a little girl peering out of a car window during a heavy San Fernando Valley shower. For her efforts, Frampton won best photograph in the suburban sections at the 1964 Los Angeles Times Editorial Awards. (+)

Feb. 20, 1947: A blast rips apart the O’Connor Electro-Plating Corp. building in the 900 block of East Pico Boulevard, killing 17 and injuring about 150. The force of the blast shattered glass in some buildings a mile away. (+)

#1: © Andrew Arnott / Los Angeles Times:
The caption on this Times photo published Feb. 21, 1947, the day after the explosion at O’Connor Electro-Plating Corp. building, read: “Firemen, police officers and volunteer rescuers here are combing the ruins, searching for victims still trapped beneath fallen bricks, timbers and whole sections of broken buildings. Compression blew out windows in nearby buildings and shattered glass in some structures more than a mile away, while reverberating roar carried as far as San Fernando Valley and Los Angeles Harbor.”

#2: © Los Angeles Times:
Catholic priests move among victims of the O’Connor blast, administering last rites.

#3: © Los Angeles Times:
An aerial photo of the O’Conner Electro-Plating Corp. building blast scene taken from the Goodyear blimp. This photo was published in The Times the day after the blast; the names of the streets were added by a Times staff artist.

© Larry Sharkey / Los Angeles Times, Mar. 2, 1970, The Oscars

Cleave Sharry of Dodge Trophies Inc. of Los Angeles dips Oscar statuettes in layers of copper, nickel and gold. The company in 1970 was marking its 35th year of providing the trophies for the Academy Awards presentation.