“I don’t have a philosophy. I have a camera.”

EXHIBITION: THE BLACK CHRONICLES II
at Rivington Place, London, UK

The Black Chronicles II is a newly curated exhibition exploring black presences (African and Asian) in 19th and early 20th century Britain, through the prism of studio photography.

Drawing on the metaphor of the chronicle the exhibition presents over 200 photographs, the majority of which have never been exhibited or published before. As a curated body of work, these photographs present new knowledge and offer different ways of seeing the black subject in Victorian Britain, and contribute to an ongoing process of redressing persistent ‘absence’ within the historical record.

A highlight of the show is a dedicated display of thirty portraits of members of The African Choir, who toured Britain between 1891-93, seen here for the first time. Perhaps the most comprehensive series of images rendering the black subject in Victorian Britain, these extraordinary portraits on glass plate negatives by the London Stereoscopic Company have been deeply buried in the Hulton Archive, unopened for over 120 years.

These are presented alongside those of other visiting performers, dignitaries, servicemen, missionaries, students and many as yet unidentified black Britons. Their presence bears direct witness to Britain’s colonial and imperial history and the expansion of Empire. (read more)

Exhibition dates:
Sep 12 - Nov 29, 2014

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CHRISTIAN STOLLEPIC

Christian Stoll’s wide angle views of futuristic locations, ‘Epic’; most of the images are part of worldwide print campaigns for IBM and Microsoft.

Find more photos here.

“I regret nothing. There have been things I missed, but I ask no questions, because I have loved it, such as it has been, even the moments of emptiness, even the unanswered - and that I loved it, that is the unanswered in my life.”
— Ayn Rand, The Fountainhead

© Arnold Odermatt, 1965, Buochs, Switzerland

Arnold Odermatt joined a Swiss police force in 1948 after being forced to give up his original career as a baker and pastry chef for health reasons. As a policeman he first appeared with his camera at the scene of an accident to take photos to complement police reports, people found this odd. At that time, photography was anything other than an independent means of providing the police with evidence.

A colleague once observed Arnold Odermatt as he took pictures for the force and was suspicious. He was ordered to report to his commander immediately. Odermatt managed to convince his superiors of the quality of the work he was doing. They allowed him to convert an old toilet in an observation post into a makeshift dark room. When the observation post was moved into another building several years later, he was finally given his own laboratory. (+)

Find more of his work here.

© Dorothea Lange, 1956, US Highway 40, California

"I invented nothing new. I simply assembled the discoveries of other men behind whom were centuries of work. Had I worked fifty or ten or even five years before, I would have failed. So it is with every new thing. Progress happens when all the factors that make for it are ready, and then it is inevitable. To teach that a comparatively few men are responsible for the greatest forward steps of mankind is the worst sort of nonsense.” Henry Ford

HAPPY 102nd BIRTHDAY WOLFGANG SUSCHITZKY!

Mr. Suschitzky was born August 29, 1912. He lives in London where he has resided since the 1930’s when he fled his native Austria prior to World War II. Find a selection of his images here.

Find additional videos (filmed in 2006) here: Web Of Stories. The site contains 34 videos of Suschitzky totaling more than 2 hours. (via Lumiere)

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“There’s a point in life when you get tired of chasing everyone and trying to fix everything, but it’s not giving up. It’s realizing that you don’t need certain people and their crap.”